can you just remind me when i get down that the people who say mean things or dont understand my decision have not seen how my illnesses have affected my life

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artfucker1996:

i’m not very good at small talk, i want 2 talk about dying and aliens and sex and meaning and the sky i am terrible at asking about school and weather 

502,424 notes
I think we are well-advised to keep on nodding terms with the people we used to be, whether we find them attractive company or not. Otherwise they turn up unannounced and surprise us, come hammering on the mind’s door at 4 a.m. of a bad night and demand to know who deserted them, who betrayed them, who is going to make amends. We forget all too soon the things we thought we could never forget. We forget the loves and the betrayals alike, forget what we whispered and what we screamed, forget who we were.
― Joan Didion, Slouching Towards Bethlehem (via perfect)

(Source: larmoyante)

1,846 notes

heyatleastitsnotcancer:

I hate when people say “overcome” a disability or chronic illness. You don’t overcome something you will have the rest of your life, you learn to live with it and adjust around it.

1,697 notes

sylvester-calzone:

finally told my parents they’re gay

(Source: drunkerd)

430,810 notes

whydontihatemarrymyself:

vajoochie:

how do boys look good without makeup

thats it. thats literally it. entirely. for serious though

1,006,825 notes
'Healthy people don't understand how a person can be sick for months and years and have doctors still not know what's wrong with her. Some people get a funny look in their eye, like they think it must all be in my head because otherwise wouldn't I have a diagnosis by now? Medical science is so advanced, with all this technology and such, so how come good doctors can't figure out what's wrong with me?'

In the Kingdom of the Sick: A Social History of Chronic Illness in America

by Laurie Edwards

quoting Aviva Brandt, who is chronically ill and undiagnosed

(via rainbowrosepetals)

1,098 notes